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20130216
20130216
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines came into in 2009 and subsequently it has stabilized significantly since then. so the primary mission of marines in southwest afghanistan is security. but our secondary mission is to assist our interagency partners in kick starting institutions that contribute to a stable nation state. as an educator i joined the team to oversee the portfolio of education and was given the opportunity to implement the country's education strategic plan over the southwest provinces. additionally i was given the national action plan for women and control of two female engagement teams which were marines trained to interact with the population of women because of the pashi culture, the males were not allowed to interact with the women. in order obviously to ensure communities stay strong you have to not only address the men, but you absolutely need to address the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency par
that in total to our adversaries. in this case, it is the taliban. to get to your point about afghanistan being a base for al qaeda, it has been the goal of the administration to eliminate afghanistan as a base for al qaeda and similar elements. it remains to be seen if they can do that. a drawdown will make it more difficult for us to accomplish that in the long run. host: a couple comments on twitter, asking questions about positive accomplishments. guest: the surge was designed to replicate what happened in iraq. in iraq, you had a situation with the anbar awakening. you had the situation, being in, using local forces in order to gain the upper hand against the extremists, whether they were affiliated with al qaeda or were local sympathizers with saddam hussein. that basically worked from a military perspective. when you go to afghanistan, the time when general petraeus became the commander, the attempt was made to replicate what happened. the results were mixed. you had similar afghan units in several provinces that have been turned into a pretty decent area of success for our research effo
to their school in kabul, where they have been trying to win back their freedom from the taliban and their music. now, they have come to america to perform. do you like america? >> yes. it's very beautiful. >> reporter: she plays the sitar, in a country where women almost never perform. eraj plays, too. for so long, there was no music. >> music was ban -- >> reporter: banned? >> banned. and they didn't want music. >> reporter: and the music wasn't the only thing stolen. do you have a mom and dad? [ speaking foreign language ] she tells us she's an orphan who lost bhoert mother and her father to the fighting with the taliban. do you remember your mom and dad? you do. ky i can see your smile. she wishes they could hear her music, just as we did. ♪ and right there waiting to perform for us, too, eraj. and just listen to what he said after hearing her. >> she's better than me. >> reporter: she's better than you? >> yeah. >> reporter: but he would play, too. ♪ he turned to her and said, she was playing better than him. >> that clearly shows the future of afghanistan. sometimes the girls can be mu
about what it's like to live with the taliban? what it's like to live with al-qaeda. tearing down statues of religious icons, terrorizing women, making it unlivable for people who are trying to start a business. why don't we talk about that? instead, you want to blame the united states. i don't understand it. >> well, i've been to afghanistan many times, juan, and i'd be happy to go with you. i feel that after ten-plus years of occupation there, when we leave, the afghan people are going to be struggling themselves over who is in control of their government. we can't come in from the outside and socially engineer other people's countries. what we have to do is protect ourselves here at home. >> juan: amany at protecting ourselves by killing terrorists and doing it strategically, surgically as opposed to launching a full scale war. but you don't seem to agree. >> that's just not true. we're creating more enemies than we're killing. we're violating international law and our own constitution, including americans overseas with absolutely no judicial process. that is shameful. >> juan:
to us and said they were going to renounce themselves from the taliban. and this is how i believe we win the war, for what it's worth. i believe that by lowering the supporters of the taliban and by that and stopping their freedom of movement, we win the war and stop terrorism. so that's what we were trying to do on this mission. but almost immediately upon entering the village, my team was under attack. it was an ambush, and it was big. it didn't take me long to realize that it wasn't a normal ambush. i've been in quite a few fire fights by this time, but it's like at the first of any fire fight it's kind of like the dust comes in, you try to figure out any situation, the dust comes in, you figure it out, and then your training kicks in, and you just start doing your job after about 10 or 15 minutes. but not in this fight. it was like one thing after another started to fail us. and everything started to fall like a house of cards. everything that we relied on in every other fire fight to support us wasn't happening. it was like our mission was falling quickly like a house of cards. and
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)